Monthly Advice–January & February

Next month is Black History Month. Black History is American history. Black History is World History. So while learning and celebration, discussion and recognition, should happen all year, February is the focused time of year.

As we gear up for Black History Month, I challenge all teachers, parents, families, and students to read stories by Black authors and to read about Black history–and when I mean history, I mean dig deep: go beyond the staple names you have heard year after year. Find a new story, a new person, a new part of history.

Elementary teachers, and secondary ELA and History teachers, are uniquely positioned to read to their students. Secondary teachers not in ELA and history, I challenge you to be seen reading such literature.

Need some ideas? I found this list Top 150 Recommended African-American Children’s Books. I wish I had had this years ago! Some I know and love: Brown Girl Dreaming, One Crazy Summer, and Henry’s Freedom Box. Some are new and I can’t wait to read them!

Let’s make this the best Black History Month for all our students–let’s provide them, and ourselves as many stories as possible, as many mirrors and windows as possible. . .

Welcome Back, it’s 2020!

Welcome back to the second half–in the US at least–of the school year, and welcome to a whole new actual year: 2020.

This winter and spring:

  • I hope to continue a focus on equity, diversity, and inclusion;
  • I hope to create at least one or two more products; and
  • I hope to find more ways to marry technology and instruction

These, I guess, are my resolutions–and I think I’m sharing them to keep myself accountable 😉

Winter Break

I’m taking my winter break, and I hope you will too.

Read for fun, Netflix and chill, sleep in, catch up on some Hulu originals, travel, relax–it’s time for a break, we earned it.

See you again in 2020!

December 17, 2019: Quote of the Day

“If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up people together to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea.”

–Antoine de Saint-Exupery