Why do I teach?

Installment #2:

Time to get a little real about the benefits and joys of teaching:

  • Guaranteed breaks, holidays, and weekends

I am guaranteed every major holiday, and every weekend, which, in the United States in particular, is incredible.

I work hard. I work long hours. I’m exhausted. Nevertheless, I know that I get days away from work–guaranteed.

I know that if I want to spend a national holiday somewhere, I can do it. I know I have every weekend to run errands. I know that I have a week or two break in the middle of the year built into my schedule.

I earned these days, and I have to take them, which in the United States in particular, is a definitive perk.

I have friends that barely have two weeks worth of paid vacation and/or sick days. I have friends who never get a chance to use their paid time off, and then lose those days. When it’s not demanded or required, it’s not used. Paid leave–in all its forms–is a privilege. So, I love and cherish breaks, weekends, and holidays; they’re definitely a bonus. It’s not why I chose teaching, but as I get older it’s definitely an enticing reason to stay in teaching.

 

Why do I teach?

Why do I teach? This is a multi-dimensional, evolving question that cannot be answered in a single post; so, let’s start with the first three things that come to mind.

I teach because:

  • it’s my passion
  • it’s fun
  • it’s rewarding

Teaching is a special line of work.

I picked teaching, initially, because I thought I was going to be a professor someday–and that someday could still happen, it just doesn’t seem to be in my near future.

I picked teaching in the K-12 setting because I wanted to make sure I enjoyed teaching, and could teach, before I pursued teaching at the highest academic level (university setting).

The good news: teaching became my passion, and it’s fun, and it’s been one of the most rewarding experiences of my life.